Jump to content

Custom Search




Welcome to the Ford C-MAX Energi Forum


Sign In  Log in with Facebook

Create Account
Welcome to the Ford C-MAX Energi Forum. You must register to create topics or post in our community - but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Ford C-MAX Energi Forum by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members
  • Create a photo album and post images. . .more.
Click here to create an account now.
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Get you C-MAX Energi Registered in the official Ford Authorized Registry. More here.


Photo
- - - - -

questionable charging practices


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 07 May 2019 - 07:32 PM

Apologies in advance if these have been covered elsewhere:

 

If charging outside, what's the risk of charging in light rain?  I've been avoiding it and watching the weather carefully (no garage), but have inadvertently been caught on a few occasions, with no apparent ill effects.  Charger cradle is protected--I keep that in a covered bin near the car; the charge connector is locked onto the car, and a heavy gauge extension cord plugs into an external enclosure (120V).

 

I've also disconnected a charge in progress once by unplugging the extension cord, because of rain that came up sooner than expected.  The charge log notes it as an unexpected event.  Any issues as far as negative impacts to the car/charging system are concerned?  I did read that the reason for plugging into the car last (and unplugging first?) is to avoid risk of electrocution and to allow a handshake between the connector and the vehicle.

 

I've read Raja's notes on preserving battery longevity with some interest. Is there any consensus that charging with a 240V charger has a significant impact on long term battery health compared to 120V? 

 

-Mike G









Lose this advertisement by becoming a member. Click here to create a free account.

#2 OFFLINE   ecraigsmit

ecraigsmit

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 28 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationCT
  • Current Vehicle:2013 cmax energi

Posted 08 May 2019 - 03:56 AM

Mike, you're fine in light rain, the system will stop if it detects a short. I would have more concern about the extension cord in the rain.  Concerning disconnecting while a charge is in process, squeeze the unlock trigger on the charging handle but leave the charger plug/body inserted in car until you hear the relays under the hood click. This might take up to 5s or so.  This will let the car disconnect gracefully, if you don't give it enough time to do this you get the "unexpected event" log.


Edited by ecraigsmit, 08 May 2019 - 03:56 AM.


#3 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 08 May 2019 - 06:23 AM

Mike, as said above you should always squeeze the trigger and wait for the charging click to stop charging before pulling the connector now.  Never unplug the extension cord while charging you will get a spark, same thing if you pull the trigger out quickly before charging stops.  The only exception to that is if the charge cycle is already complete.

 

I charge in the rain no problem you don't have to worry about it.  The EVSE plug to the car is rain proof.  If you have to leave the charger itself outside, then you can put it inside the car on the drivers floor mat and run the extension cord to plug.  Close the door on the wires its not a problem I do it all the time rain or not when I am on the road in hotels or whatnot as someone already stole my charger once in 2014 I'm not having it stolen again.  Inside the car it will be safe from rain and you might want to do that if you're concerned about that as well as if you are on the road charging publicly somewhere.

 

120v charging causes less heat to the battery pack than 240v charging.  It comes into play more and more the hotter it is outside.  Also the benefits of slower 120v charging at night is that it takes more time to charging and that means the cooling fan can run longer to cool a hot battery pack.  At night if I get home and the HVB is hot or hotter than I like, I can roll down the windows and leave the tailgate open and plug the car in to charge for about 45 minutes and the cold air outside can drop the battery temp from 75 to 68.  I like that.  I do that until I see no more drop (it drops fast at first slower later) and then disconnect it and go to bed if I don't need it charged all the way.  Basically I just charge it from empty to around 10-20% on 120v to do this.  If you use 240v it will charge to 50% and it won't drop as much (the temperature) and then the battery has to sit hot at a higher charger level = worse for the battery.

 

240v can  be useful in different situations but 120v also has its benefits.

 

You should be more concerned about charging outside in the sun and heat (in the summer) more so than the rain.  The rain is more of a blessing :)

 

-=>Raja.



#4 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 08 May 2019 - 06:06 PM

Thank you both for the info.  The car is going into its first "hot weather" charging season, as it was at the dealer's in 2018 used as a loaner.  As a result, I don't think it got charged up on any kind of regular basis before I got the vehicle early this year.  I'm currently (no pun intended) at 25 miles estimated range on full charge now that the weather has gotten warmer.  Haven't crunched numbers on equivalent kWh per full charge, but I expect the battery is in pretty good shape and would like to keep it that way.

 

I'll definitely avoid future incorrect disconnects.  Planning to replace the weather-proof bin with a modified lockable mailbox enclosure for the cradle to be stored in, installed on the side of the house near the driveway.  The heavy gauge extension cord is in excellent condition, and with both ends protected that shouldn't present a problem.  One night I happened to check the end of the extension cord where the tail of the cradle plugged in while charging, and while it was noticeably warm, it wasn't hot.  Almost all my charges to date have been charges to full, so disconnects hadn't been an issue and I definitely hadn't waited five seconds--now I know better on that front at least!  

 

Thanks for the reassurance on charging in the rain.  It's been a major effort to keep very close track of local weather, trying to get the charge in some evenings before the weather descends!  Nice to be able to relax on that front.

 

Has anyone modified the original molded charge cord assembly to remove the cord reel part?  It'll be a very tight fit in the planned enclosure, and since it'll be in the enclosure 95% of the time, it'd be good if I could safely remove the cord reel surrounding the rectangular EVSE itself.  I'm not concerned about the inconvenience of managing the excess cable on the occasional travelling trip.

 

The idea of opening the windows for the initial charging period to drop the battery temp is an interesting one.

 

I'm still struggling to digest everything I've read on battery management.  No more high speed EV Now stints from here on out, not that there's been much occasion for that anyway.



#5 OFFLINE   Billyk24

Billyk24

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 103 posts
  • Region:U.S. Great Lakes
  • LocationButler, Pa.
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Titanium, 2005 Ford Escape Hybrid 4wd

Posted 08 May 2019 - 06:42 PM

Scanguage II will monitor your battery temperature and help with charging questions.   In general, during the warm summer months, avoid parking the vehicle with a high state of charge.   



#6 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 08 May 2019 - 08:07 PM

So I came back this afternoon from NY.  Battery temp was about 75 IIRC and there was still 9 miles of range.  I mowed the lawn, did the mail, then tonight I ran a couple of errands and used up the rest of the battery.  The temp was still showing 77 when I got home so I plugged in the car with the slow charger, windows open tailgate up and it has now charged up to 31% SOC from 19 on the SG II.  40 SOC is 25% charge on the MFM screen.  The temp has dropped to 69.  A very good thing in my opinion as leaving it with the windows closed and the garage closed overnight the temp would not drop as quickly.  Before I go to bed I will unplug it (shortly).  I think the temp drop probably will plateau and not drop as quick from here down.  It is about 48 outside now.  Some pictures for you to see below.

 

In the 2nd picture you can see the SG info.  Fan is running at 975 rpms. Battery temp at 69 down from 77, SOC charge and charge rate (how many amps).  I use my wife's mini cooper charger for the Cmax as it charges even slower than the stock 120v Ford charger and gives me more time with the fan running to drop the battery temp before the charge level on the battery gets too high for me.  Note that when you stop charging the cooling fan for the battery won't run any more, and, if you are in value charge waiting to charge at 4am it won't run either.  The fan you hear inside the car while plugged in waiting to charge is the charging circuit fan, not the HVB fan.  The HVB fan is super quiet and hard to hear, you can barely hear it in the short window when you unplug the car and stop the charging circuit fan, the HVB fan will run for less then 1 minute and stop.

 

Hope this helps.

 

-=>Raja.

Attached Files


Edited by rbort, 08 May 2019 - 08:17 PM.


#7 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 08 May 2019 - 08:47 PM

Last update.  Unplugged it just now.  The HVB fan stopped since the temp dropped to 66 (needs to be 8 degrees higher than car internal temp for it to run), so I guess its over I've done my duty no reason to charge it any further and its at 24% pretty good enough for me don't really want to go beyond 25% anyways for tonight...

 

-=>Raja.

 

 

Attached Files



#8 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 09 May 2019 - 06:00 PM

It looks like a large percentage of energi owners have the ScanGauge II, going by pics attached to posts on different threads.  Is everyone using the Ford Escape Hybrid X Gauge set, or do people program their own to be specific to the C-Max energi?

 

My (mental) challenge around not charging the battery fully is that I'm generally using the vehicle for a 7 mile round trip daily commute (at moderate speeds) on EV only.  With the nominal range being from 13 - 25 miles depending on seasonal temperatures, keeping the battery only modestly charged means not having enough for a spontaneous additional errand without switching over to regular hybrid mode.  Looks like I'll have to adjust my mindset of wanting to run pure EV whenever possible.  I've seen the figure of 60% SOC on other posts here as a max amount for maintaining long term battery health, but the additional concern of not leaving the battery significantly charged when ambient temps are 86 degrees or higher (even when not in use) is a corker!  Lots of constraints going on here.  Sadly, as a famous fictitious engineer put it, "Ya canna' change the laws o' physics!"

 

It's ironic that the hotter it is, the better the nominal range, but the less one dares to charge the battery!

 

Is there any straightforward way of stopping a charging session at a target state of charge, apart from monitoring it?  I guess you could use value charge time windows to approximate that.  

 

Again, if this has been covered in excruciating detail previously I can go back into the catacombs (earlier threads) ...

 

-Mike G



#9 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 969 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 10 May 2019 - 04:47 AM

Well...  Yes, there are physics involved and batteries are a pain in what they want for long term survival.  But It seems there could have been some features added to make this car a lot less "good" at killing the battery without it needing constant attention.  Some cheaper than others.

 

As far as stopping the car at a certain charge point, there's nothing built in.  The charge time windows won't do that.  They will only try to schedule the charging for your preferred window and to be ready when you ask, but it will still charge to 100%.

 

The only thing remotely built in is to set an alert when it reaches the % you want, which you have to do every time.

 

Otherwise, your next best bet is going to be either a timer on the outlet that powers your EVSE, or better yet, the EVSE itself.

 

The downsides to pulling the power is that you'll also be killing the power that it uses to run the cooling fans for the battery/charger.  You basically want to stop the charging and then get the EVSE back and powered on for the cooling fans, but not have it resume charging. 

 

 

It looks like a large percentage of energi owners have the ScanGauge II, going by pics attached to posts on different threads.  Is everyone using the Ford Escape Hybrid X Gauge set, or do people program their own to be specific to the C-Max energi?

 

My (mental) challenge around not charging the battery fully is that I'm generally using the vehicle for a 7 mile round trip daily commute (at moderate speeds) on EV only.  With the nominal range being from 13 - 25 miles depending on seasonal temperatures, keeping the battery only modestly charged means not having enough for a spontaneous additional errand without switching over to regular hybrid mode.  Looks like I'll have to adjust my mindset of wanting to run pure EV whenever possible.  I've seen the figure of 60% SOC on other posts here as a max amount for maintaining long term battery health, but the additional concern of not leaving the battery significantly charged when ambient temps are 86 degrees or higher (even when not in use) is a corker!  Lots of constraints going on here.  Sadly, as a famous fictitious engineer put it, "Ya canna' change the laws o' physics!"

 

It's ironic that the hotter it is, the better the nominal range, but the less one dares to charge the battery!

 

Is there any straightforward way of stopping a charging session at a target state of charge, apart from monitoring it?  I guess you could use value charge time windows to approximate that.  

 

Again, if this has been covered in excruciating detail previously I can go back into the catacombs (earlier threads) ...

 

-Mike G



#10 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 10 May 2019 - 05:52 AM

If you need to use it, you need to charge it.  However if you can plan it, you may not need to charge it daily.  Figure this, I went to VA last week.  From the hotel to the field is 7 miles.  I charged it overnight at the hotel, went to the field, went back to the hotel, didn't charge it.  Went back to the field, then charged it at the field just enough to make it back to the hotel (<1 hour and I quit charging when I saw the battery temp rising).  Then charged it at the hotel overnight again when the temps were cooler (some days were 85F in VA).

 

So instead of going 100%-50% and back up to 100% I went 100% to 0% or close to it (I think around 10%) and then back up. But you might want to do other things so charge it to 100% if you think you will use more of it.  Nothing wrong with using the battery to commute back and forth daily all the time, though after about 2 to 3 years you might wear it out quickly if that is all you use to go to work.  Remember that the battery has several life factors that cause degradation:

 

#1 the amount of charge/discharge cycles

#2 the average temperature of the battery pack

#3 the average charge level of the battery pack

#4 height and depth of charge/discharge with a temp factor added in

 

So at the end of the day, #1 try to keep the battery not fully charged all the time unless you need it.  Don't get me wrong, whenever I need to run errands and think I might need most or all of it I charge it all the way, but if I am going to the grocery store and they have a charger there for example, I put in enough to get there, use their charger, and have enough to get home without hitting empty or full charge.  If they don't have a charger there I put enough to get there and back with about 5-10% to spare try not to dig into the hybrid battery if I can plan it right.

 

#2 try to keep the battery life easy, don't stress it, don't go more than 2 bars on the battery and if you have to go 2 bars for a long time (a long hill) consider taking a different route or prestarting the engine so it can take some of that load off the battery as extended 2 bar usage raises the battery temp quickly.  This translates to never drive more than 50mph on the highway on the battery if you intent to use the whole battery.  A short spurt for 1 exit going up to 60 is OK but watch and think about your continuous draw of the battery.  If its downhill you're not concerned, but trying to maintain 50 on an uphill on the highway is even a concern for me. At the end of the day, this is not an electric only car, you DO have an engine, use it once in a while its good for the engine to run sometimes too.  But use the engine and warm it up, not 1 mile here and there only, that could backfire and cause water in the oil forcing an oil maintenance mode.  By not an electric car, you have to understand that the battery is quite small compared to electric cars only, so high loads on it are pretty stressful.  I mean you can draw up to 200 amps out of the battery if you floor it, at 2 bars you are at 80-100 amps range, and that battery is 25 amp/hr so you can draw 8C out of it which is alot compared to an electric car that has 10x that battery so 200 amps would be closer to 1C.  Does that make sense?  The battery in this car is meant for light loads, you are dragging a whole second propulsion system around, a complete engine, transmission and 14 gallon gas tank, so its definitely hard on the battery to lug all this around and give you speed and climb hills.  Keep that in mind and the battery will last 10 years nicely, abuse it and you join the 3.x kwh capacity remaining club, alot of those guys around.  I've been saying this for years but many did not believe me sadly... :(  With all this being said, my personal limit I try to stay below 80 amps draw on the battery, try to use around 65 when accelerating and such.  people behind me tailgate and get upset sometimes, I apologize though they can't hear me, it is what it is.  I go faster if I have an engine running, but still no more than 2 white bars anyways for efficiency though up hills it can be more up to 3 on the highways at cruise.

 

#3 the nominal range of this car should be between 22 and 37 miles.  If you are getting less than 22 miles and have a good battery you are driving it too hard or using heat.  Try not to use heat remember it adds 1 bar of load all the time on the battery, use the engine for heat if you must, dress for it, or only use it when its cool outside but not when its freezing or below. (electric heat is costly).

 

Below if a picture of my car's range, I get about 30 these days with the temps in the 50-70 range.  Will be more in the summer like you say, as there is less air resistance and gear oil is more fluid, but worse on the battery due to elevated temps I have to watch it more like a hawk.  The nice thing is that in the winter you don't have to worry about battery temp at all, you can do what you do its never a problem.  The season to watch and be careful is now through October.

 

-=>Raja.

Attached Files


Edited by rbort, 10 May 2019 - 06:03 AM.


#11 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 10 May 2019 - 06:19 PM

Thanks, Raja and Levi.  Some of those lessons I've already taken on board.  I don't know that I've ever put on the heat in EV Now, but instead make use of the seat warmer.  Wore gloves this morning to avoid getting hands chilled while driving, which is typical.  On the couple of days early this year when it was just too cold, I set it to EV Later and used the heat.

 

I don't think I can drive as conservatively as you (Raja), though, at least on a consistent basis.  I do prefer back roads for local trips but never want to be in a position where I'm leading a parade.  If nobody's behind, I'm more comfortable slowing down.  On the highway (which would be EV Auto or Later), I want to be keeping up with traffic.  Prior to the CMax, that generally meant 10 mph over the limit (like most other vehicles), but since getting the CMax, I try to limit it to 5 mph over and spend more time in the right hand lane.  Given the differences in driving practices, my chances of getting your EV only range numbers are not too likely.  I still want to keep the battery healthy and am on board with the 2 bar rule--except that in EV Now you can't display those gauges!!!

 

So it looks like the vehicle will accomplish two of my initial goals, which are: 100% EV for my short daily commute, and an efficient vehicle for longer trips.  Have to give up the practice of trying to get as far as possible on EV only, and need to figure out how to minimize # of charge cycles.  

 

Have there been posts on systems people have set up to keep the car interior cool while parked?  The C-Max has a huge front windshield (the shade I used for my Outback is short by a good seven additional inches).  It seems like an ideal setup to use a large flexible solar cell array up there as part of the windshield shade and drive a couple of fans off an inverter.  Should probably start a separate thread, as that's moved off topic.  What little I've read suggests that people have used small arrays with limited power and low power fans with limited effect. 

 

I feel lucky in that a lot of folks have contributed to this forum and done the heavy lifting and learning (and sharing) over the past several years, so I don't have to discover it through painful experience.

 

Thanks!

 

-Mike G

 

P.S. To Levi's point about "But It seems there could have been some features added to make this car a lot less "good" at killing the battery without it needing constant attention." the hopeful thing is that they got a lot right with the drivetrain, and that's 2013 tech.  Somebody is going to put the good stuff together and address battery and capacity management in a high utility, reasonable cost footprint.  I don't think the Kia Niro is it (having test driven one) as the engine transition and driving experience is not as good as the C-Max, but it'll happen.  It'll be interesting to see what Ford does with the new Escape Hybrid.



#12 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 10 May 2019 - 08:23 PM

Hey Mike:

 

 

 

-except that in EV Now you can't display those gauges!!!

 

I hardly ever use EV Now.  Its always in Auto mode for EV driving and EV later to start the engine.  EV now I use barely for a specific situation, I'm using EV heat in the winter and I don't want it to start the engine.  Generally I've used this when I was plugged into 240v charging and wanted to sit warm in the car.  You have to power up the car to run the heat and then plug in (in the 2017 model), and if you are in EV now it lowers the threshold of starting the engine, in Auto mode the car says "he wants heat" so let's use electric and start the engine to get it as quick as possible if the temp is low enough.

 

If you drive in Auto you will have the bars in the Empower screen.    That's what I use just about all the time.  

 

As for driving fast on the highway, you will find out its not necessary.  You spent alot of your life driving in the left lane trying to keep up with traffic at 75mph but if you cruise at 65 in the middle or right lane you will start to notice there are people that go that speed also.  Many people are in a rush all the time but those days are over for me, I rather sit back, relax and call someone than change lanes left and right all over the highway to maintain 75mph or more.  But I understand its not for everyone, some must just drive faster and it is what it is.  The Cmax mpg does plummet the faster you go, meaning if you're maintaining 75mph you won't bust through 40mpg on the highway, would be closer to 37 in the winter might be a little better in the summer.  Drag is costly and doubles when you speed up from 55 to 75mph.

 

I think the best course of action is to park in the shade, under a tree or by a building and leave all 4 windows cracked.  Trying to park in the sun and using a solar panel to push hot air out of the car isn't going to help as much as the shade.  It may mean you have to park way in the back of the lot and walk a distance back to the building but its important for the car's battery health that you take a walk.  I already realize many people want to park as close as possible, but with my Cmax I have to look for shade.  In virginia I didn't park in any shade there wasn't any around in the open field and the battery temp did rise from 78 to 91F just sitting there for hours in the sun.  I didn't charge the battery at all due to this, left windows open but it didn't help much.  On cloudy days it didn't rise as much.  I didn't have a better choice there, but I always think about it.

 

-=>Raja.


Edited by rbort, 11 May 2019 - 07:12 AM.

  • kyledamron likes this

#13 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 969 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 11 May 2019 - 02:41 AM

I'm not sure I follow...  Is this something they did in the 2017's?  On my 2013 I can definitely view all of the gauges in  EV Now...

 

 I still want to keep the battery healthy and am on board with the 2 bar rule--except that in EV Now you can't display those gauges!!!

 



#14 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 11 May 2019 - 07:13 AM

No doesn't work in the 2013 either Levi.  What we're talking about is the blue rectangle with the blue line inside.  If you switch to EV now the rectangle does away, you just have a blue line.

 

-=>Raja.



#15 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 11 May 2019 - 07:59 AM

I've always been concerned about inadvertently starting the engine on my short (3 mile per leg) commute, which is not a great distance to run a combustion engine for warming it up properly.  Even in EV Now I've triggered it a few times (fat fingered the ventilation power button while wearing gloves, trying to turn on the driver seat heater, another time turning on standard defrost without face level already being on, and another time hitting Max Defrost by accident instead of standard defrost.  I was thinking that in EV Auto, it just takes a little too aggressive pedal action to start the engine...however, on a highway trip I put it on EV Auto with a fully charged battery, thinking it would kick in the ICE once I got to highway speeds, and to my surprise it just stayed on EV until it used up the plug-in capacity.  [This is where EV Later would come in to prevent that behavior]  So, I will give EV Auto a try and hope to avoid hitting the threshold (with the help of the gauge, now!!) 

 

The commuter rail parking situation's not too bad--I routinely park on the side a wooded slope behind, so the windshield faces west and the sunshade helps on that front.  Even so, temps get uncomfortably warm in the cabin.  I will poke around and see what the options are for cabin interior cooling.  Questions include whether the dash vents are automatically blocked at some point when the car is off (since air has to come in and exhaust from somewhere)--would much rather use existing openings than open a window enough to mount some kind of small fan assembly.  If I manage to come up with some kind of practical science project, I'll post details. 



#16 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 11 May 2019 - 08:38 AM

I answered my own earlier question about removing the cord cradle from the OEM charger cord assembly.  After looking at it more closely, I figured out that the cradle at one end of the electronic brick can be bent to open somewhat, and the brick can be lifted out.  Completely reversible and nondestructive!  That will be helpful when I install the charger cord in a permanent locked enclosure near where the car is parked.



#17 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 969 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 12 May 2019 - 05:17 AM

Uhh, OK.  So what difference does that make?  The blue line is just the threshold of where the ICE will start.  Which in EV Now is not at all unless you're asking the battery for it's maximum for too long.

 

You can still see the bars to know where 2 bars of power usage is...

 

No doesn't work in the 2013 either Levi.  What we're talking about is the blue rectangle with the blue line inside.  If you switch to EV now the rectangle does away, you just have a blue line.

 

-=>Raja.



#18 OFFLINE   MikeG

MikeG

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMassachusetts
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Ford C-Max energi

Posted 13 May 2019 - 03:05 PM

So, after Levi's comment I played around with available gauges in EV Now and found the other options.  I was sure I'd done that previously and only seen the one (instantaneous miles/full charge rate bar).  This car keeps surprising me, even after going through the owners manual cover to cover a couple of times, diving into forum threads, and having driven it for four and a half months.  On the newly found gauge displays, now that I have the needed info to hand, I think I'll just keep it in EV Now for my short moderate speed commutes.  Sadly it seems like in EV Now the non-default display selection doesn't stick, and has to be switched to every time on start up.

 

Have charged in the rain a couple of times now, though start of charging (plugging in) was prior to the rain starting.

 

-Mike G



#19 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 969 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 14 May 2019 - 04:32 AM

Yeah, the car definitely has things it likes to "reset" on you, like if you're trying to use EV Later but you make a quick stop, and/or some of the displays you're talking about that like to switch back to the climate screen or other little areas.

 

And yes, it takes a LONG time(if ever) that you really start to learn everything.  Heck, I've had mine for like 3 or 4 years now, and always thought the headrests were awfully annoying/not able to get into a great body position and it wasn't until last month or so when I managed to catch a post on here where someone mentioned that you simply need to tilt them forward(the way I DON'T want them to go) to be able to adjust them.  Wah-la, the seats are finally a lot more comfortable!

 

So, after Levi's comment I played around with available gauges in EV Now and found the other options.  I was sure I'd done that previously and only seen the one (instantaneous miles/full charge rate bar).  This car keeps surprising me, even after going through the owners manual cover to cover a couple of times, diving into forum threads, and having driven it for four and a half months.  On the newly found gauge displays, now that I have the needed info to hand, I think I'll just keep it in EV Now for my short moderate speed commutes.  Sadly it seems like in EV Now the non-default display selection doesn't stick, and has to be switched to every time on start up.

 

Have charged in the rain a couple of times now, though start of charging (plugging in) was prior to the rain starting.

 

-Mike G



#20 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 4,337 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 14 May 2019 - 06:44 AM

You should always use auto rather than EV now.  While you see the bars better in the threshold around it, Auto will allow the engine to start in an emergency and get you out of trouble if necessary.  This means that if you are pulling out of somewhere and there is a car coming that you didn't see before and you need to floor it to get out of the way, Auto will start the engine and give you full available power of about 188HP IIRC whereas if you are in EV now the car will accelerate at max EV power only at 88HP.  A window will popup to "enable engine by pressing OK" but in an emergency moment there is no time to read or think about pressing OK.

 

You really don't get any benefit from EV now except for the fact that you lower the car's threshold to start the engine while the heat is on, and of course you lock it into EV only with no engine when you floor it in case you want to amuse yourself by the acceleration of EV only power.  That's about it.  

 

Learn to use the Empower screen in Auto mode and you don't have to worry about switching modes every time the car defaults to Auto anyways.  Plus I have to verify this, the bars may not be equal between EV now and Auto, meaning the scale may be different.  I have not looked in a while for EV now but for Engage they are certainly more compressed.  Next time out I will look and see for you.  If indeed they are more compressed then if you use 2 bars in EV now it would be more than 2 bars in Auto.  I always talk about limiting power to 2 bars in Auto, so you may end up draining the battery harder if you drive in EV now all the time and allow yourself 2 bars there.  Stay tuned, I will confirm I have to look at it again to be sure.

 

-=>Raja.


Edited by rbort, 14 May 2019 - 06:46 AM.









0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Privacy Policy TERMS OF SERVICE ·