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3 Months with New CMax


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15 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   ScottB

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 01:34 PM

I have about 3 months and 2500 miles under my belt now with my Energi. I live in Massachusetts. I have really enjoyed driving the CMax and its been very economical. A little background info on the purchase.

 

I signed a 3 year lease for the 2017 Energi Titanium from a local Ford dealer and they were using it as a courtesy vehicle given to customers when having their car serviced. I bought it in April 2018 with 3500 miles on it, but Ford treated it as a NEW vehicle purchase. It had never been titled or registered, just had dealer plates. It was essentially a demo vehicle from the dealer. I negotiated a discount of $5K off sticker (34K) due to the miles. There was also a $10K discount from Ford off the sticker for the lease, so the purchase price for the car was $19K. I lost the federal tax credit because of the lease, but I still get the Mass State rebate of $1.5K. So bottom line price paid was $17.5.  I figured not bad for a left over 2017 Titanium Energi with most options. The lease has some extra fees compared to buying new (buying new would have dropped the $10K from Ford to $4K), but it gives me the option of giving the car back after 3 years, which I liked. Also, since they aren't holding their value well, I can buy it at the end of the lease for around $10K. My lease payment is around $220 a month, which includes Mass excise and sales taxes (about $40 per month).  Anyway, pretty happy with the buying economics.

 

The gas mileage has been great, and driving an electric car has been very educational. When checking mileage on the highway with the gas engine (I guess hybrid mode) I am getting 40-50 mpg depending on how much regen KW I get from the hills. On fairly flat ground, it comes in at the advertised 40 mpg from the gas engine.  I have seen as high as 65 mpg due to a lot of regen KW assist and coasting.

 

I normally drive 7 mile round trip commute to work, and get free charging at work. So the economics work really well there  (zero commuting cost, except the lease payment).  I am on a temporary project for work that is 24 miles away. With careful driving, I am getting 29 miles out of a charge and using 5.5KW of battery power. So I charge for free at work and have to charge at night at home for the return trip. My electric bill went up about $20 this month. Still not bad.

 

Since I drive as many electric miles as possible ( I now hate to buy gas) I have only put 30 total gallons of gas in the car for my 2500 miles. I haven't use up all 30 yet, so my overall gas mileage (including the electric miles) is show at 105 mgp right now. It does come down into the 90's when I go on highway trips.

 

 Finally, I like Serious radio and decided to sign up for it when my 6 month free trial is over. They are as bad a cable and have all these packages and deals. I hate that so I got the lowest package with no deal and will pay a little over $10 per month for it. I can swallow that price, but not the $30 a month they wanted for the higher package they were pushing.

 

Final hurtle will be getting it set up for ski season. Definitely winter tires and I will see about a  ski rack and a roof box. I have to try my skis in the back with the seats down to see if they fit. If they do I will probably just get roof bars for when I have a full car and can't put down the seats. The box really lowers your highway mpg from what I have read. It drops from 40 to around 32. Still not bad, but a pretty good hit.


Edited by ScottB, 17 July 2018 - 01:38 PM.








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#2 OFFLINE   komondor

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 05:31 PM

Look at using your smart phone instead of Sirius either a music plan of the many free stations.



#3 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 05:54 PM

Question #1:

 

Do you plan to keep the car after 3 years?

 

If you do then you want to think about prolonging the HVB life and maybe burning some more gas.  Maybe even get a Scangage to watch the battery temperature and know when to stop using it.

 

If you are giving the car back after 3 years then charge it all the time and try to not use the engine as if it didn't exist so to speak.  Cheaper to run on battery but then again not the best idea for the battery as its small and will get overheated if you use it over and over by recharging it every chance you get.

 

Its a great car, I'm on my 2nd one now.  On hot days I try not to use it as much refrain from that to keep the HVB from getting too hot.   In the winter it doesn't matter, the battery can't get hot enough you can use it much more than the summer months in New England.

 

Today I drove to Montreal, AC on the HVB started at 84 F and rose to 93F even with the AC on.  OAT was like 89 to 90F.  Then we got all the thunderstorms, and the temp dropped to 70F outside.  Over time the HVB dropped from 93F back to 82F, but then it started to go back up as the sun came out the more north I went into VT.  It went back up to 89F by the time I got to Montreal.  And this is all with 1 charge and most of the time in hybrid mode on the highway with the big temperature swings.

 

Anyway, its always good to know where you're at, but if you don't keep the car after 3 years then it doesn't matter much to you.

 

Enjoy the car, is very nice and the fuel economy is awesome.  I got 48.4 mpg on my way up here to Montreal even with all the rolling hills of the green mountains as well as the rain.  It would have been much better on level grounds and without the added drag of the rain waters.

 

-=>Raja.



#4 OFFLINE   Billyk24

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 08:29 PM

I purchased my 2017 last month.  I drive from Pennsylvania, thru Ohio, Michigan and into Wisconsin where the family has a "home".  I had a Thule cargo box on my roof during this travel.   I initially was getting low 40s mpg into michigan but then the mpg started to drop while the battery heated up to around 95F with air conditioning on at 72F, OAT at around 88F, SOC dropping down to low 20s and interstate highway speed at 62-65mph.   Ended up with 37.7mpg.   Had a crosswind for much of the ride.   Then drove to and from Milwaukee (had to see family attorney on death of a member) without the cargobox and my mpg varied between 38-46.   It seemed as if the battery stayed cooler, there was an improvement in mpg numbers.  I do flip the switch between auto and EV-later.  



#5 OFFLINE   ScottB

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 12:56 PM

Raja,

 

I do plan to keep it once my  lease is up, as I like it a lot. I do make some consesions on the HVB per what you have posted on this forum. (It just makes a lot of sense).  I charge at night at home, so the temp. has been much cooler. I also leave the windows down some as long as its not going to rain. The car usually sits for a few hours, so I figure the battery has a chance to cool down. I typically drive with the windows open and don't use any AC or accesory power, other than the radio. 

 

I do drive to work every weekday in EV mode, which now at 24 miles uses most of the battery. I plug it in when I arrive and start charging. I do make sure I roll down the windows so the interior doesn't heat up. I am in partial sun due to location of the outlet, but I keep the sun shade closed on the glass roof.  The temp's have been reasonable in Mass this summer. I think only a one day did I see the cars temp. readout hit 100.  Hopefully this will allow the battery to keep its capacity.

 

I suppose I could skip some daytime charges on really hot days and just drive home on gas. Seems like passing up free electricity doesn't feel right, but on really hot days I could see it.

 

Once I get back to my 7 mile commute, I only charge every other day, so that should be a lot easier on the battery.

 

What is the most important thing to avoid to keep battery life strong?



#6 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 05:55 PM

What is the most important thing to avoid to keep battery life strong?

 

In the summer skip charging at work during the day in the sun.  Park in the shade somethere far under a tree and walk.  Also, use the gas engine for all the hard work getting there (long inclines, hills, etc), and the battery for the easy work.  BY the way, FYI if you drive all 24 miles on battery you will raise the battery temp quite some, usually it will always be hotter than the outside temp, so if its 90 outside its not unheard of the battery going to 99F.

 

So in this case maybe you use 1/2 the battery going to work, and 1/2 of it going home (better than all in 1 full swoop including climbing hills = heavy load).

 

Once October comes you can use more battery, but for now, if you plan to keep the car for a while, the HVB is priority #1 there is a gas engine in the car USE it to keep it easy on the battery.  Two years down the road you'll be glad you did (use the engine), otherwise you will be joining the HVB capacity loss club.

 

-=>Raja.


Edited by rbort, 18 July 2018 - 06:04 PM.

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#7 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 06:01 PM

As for night charging, is it in a garage or out in the street?  

 

If in the garage open the windows all the way down and open the tailgate to let the heat out while charging.

 

If outside crack all 4 windows 1/2 to 1 inch to let some heat out.

 

This is true for May through September in New England.  October through April you don't need to worry about heat nearly as much.

 

Let me say it 1 more time, HVB is #1, against all your thoughts, start the engine and burn some gas to keep the battery comfortable.  I know its very tempting to use the battery 100% of the time, but resist that thought in the summer.

 

By the way, if you get solar you'll have free electricity even at home.  My company is 2nd Generation Energy, look them up and have them give you a free quote, it will be (not might be) well worth your while.  If you do go with them, tell them I recommended you.  They give me a kickback for new customers, and if you get it I'll share some of that with you :)

 

-=>Raja.


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#8 OFFLINE   ScottB

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 07:32 AM

Raja,

 

You are very knowledgable about the CMax.  If you don't mind me asking, where did you get your info from?  Have you been talking to Ford engineers that designed the car?  Its obvious you have a lot of real world experience with the car.

 

I am a mechanical engineer and I desing cooling systems for work. I haven't learned much about the CMax, so I only know general information about how things work.

 

Your advice makes sense and it seems keeping the battery from over heating, or just getting too hot is very important. I have some specific questions that are important to decesion making on how to protect the battery: (this may have been covered in other threads?)

 

1. How many cooling systems are there for our batteries?  Seems there is a charging fan with ductwork and a non-charging fan with ductwork? 

 

2.  Where does the cooling air come from, and exhaust out to for our cars. I saw a Ford manual on line that says there are inlets in the rear storage area, not sure where the outlets are. Not sure about either for the charging fan?

 

3.  What is the max temp the battery can get to without increasing the natural degredation amount??  How was this determined?

 

4.  How much does charging increase the battery temp?  How much does heavy power draw while driving increase the battery temp?

 

 

Just some more common sense things I assume for EV now mode, which I am guessing is where you are coming from.

 

--  Keep the interior of the car as cool as possible on a hot day, (without putting more load on the battery)  especially while charging. So keep windows rolled down some and park in the shade if possible.  (I do this)

 

--  Go easy on the accelerator to keep power draw low so as not to heat up the battery.  (I do this)

 

--  Let the battery cool off if possible before charging. (I do this at night, not during the day at work)

 

--  When the outside air temp gets too high, say above 90F then don't charge the car and don't put a heavy load on the battery.

 

--  The fewer times you charge the battery, the less it will degrade. But it can take a lot of charges by design, so you just want to stay within the "normal" battery charge cycle. What is the normal cycle???  Does Ford say limit charging to once a day?

 

--It seems the feeling is Ford fell short on protecting the battery from accelerated loss of capacity due to heat issues. There are so many variables that go into that, I guess I am not surprised. Seems outside temp and whether you roll down the windows or not are major factors.

 

 

One last response, I don't have a garage and keep my car outside in the driveway while charging. I charge at night and it is almost always cool, say below 80F. I live on the ocean with nice cool sea breezes.  Charging at work is more riskey, partial shade from the building, much hotter day time temps due to no sea breeze.



#9 OFFLINE   Billyk24

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 08:22 AM

It seems as if Ford utilized the Ford Escape Hybrid cooling system 2010 and later for the CMax.  Prior to 2010, the Escape Hybrid had outside air cooling and ducts from the air conditioning system that came on when the battery temperature became too high.  The thin air conditioning  tubing was visible from under the vehicle and some owners experienced malfunction from leaks/holes which were replaced under the normal warranty.  I believe the Fusion Hybrid also utilized this cabin cooling system.   



#10 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 08:04 PM

See embedded responses:

 

Raja,

 

You are very knowledgable about the CMax.  If you don't mind me asking, where did you get your info from?  Have you been talking to Ford engineers that designed the car?  Its obvious you have a lot of real world experience with the car.

 

I am a computer science engineer. I learned to fix things when I was a kid watching my Dad do alot of things.  I pretty much am Mr. Fix it around the house and try to do my own work all the time unless I don't have the proper tools to do the job or its too complicated an I don't want to get involved.  I have read some stuff about the car, but also figured out other stuff by inspecting the car, not to mention some people on here also gave some valuable information that I could mate with my thoughts and findings.

 

I am a mechanical engineer and I desing cooling systems for work. I haven't learned much about the CMax, so I only know general information about how things work.

 

Your advice makes sense and it seems keeping the battery from over heating, or just getting too hot is very important. I have some specific questions that are important to decesion making on how to protect the battery: (this may have been covered in other threads?)

 

1. How many cooling systems are there for our batteries?  Seems there is a charging fan with ductwork and a non-charging fan with ductwork? 

 

There are two systems.  The car takes outside air from being the right rear wheel well and pushes that over the charging circuit while plugged in.  The charging circuit gets hot and that hot air is exhausted inside the car behind the right rear seat.  If you put the seat down and put your fingers between the seat and the plastic and curl them upwards towards the rear you will feel the charging circuit exhaust air.  That practically goes under that seat and warms up the car.

 

2.  Where does the cooling air come from, and exhaust out to for our cars. I saw a Ford manual on line that says there are inlets in the rear storage area, not sure where the outlets are. Not sure about either for the charging fan?

 

The HYB cooling air is taken from inside the car on the left and right vents up high behind the rear seats.  That air goes over the HVB and is exhausted under the plastic cover in the back that holds the gas funnel.  The exhaust air is on the left side.  So the HVB takes air from inside the car and exhausts it back inside the car.  It is diffused and is expected to rise out of the left and right lower vents in the hatchback area.  Ford engineers decided that the inside of the car must be cooler than outside while in use and the outside of the air (air) must be cooler while charging.  So charging air cooling comes from outside, HVB air cooling goes around in circles from the inside.  This action actually warms the car up further you can notice it nice and warm in the winter while actively charging.

 

3.  What is the max temp the battery can get to without increasing the natural degredation amount??  How was this determined?

 

Battery university document on the web talks about that.  They suggest that 86F is the max temp the HVB should be.  Doesn't mean it doesn't degrade at that temp, but they tell you that hotter batteries degrade quicker and they show graphs of tests done on batteries.  A battery that is in a hotter environment will live shorter than one in a cold environment, and the higher the state of charge the worse it is, so the hotter it is, the less the average state of charge needs to be in order to last just as long as a battery in a cooler environment.

 

4.  How much does charging increase the battery temp?  How much does heavy power draw while driving increase the battery temp?

 

Charging can increase the temperature by several degrees, just as heavy power draw on the battery can do the same.  But there are a number of factors that affect this.  OAT has alot to do with it, as well as the car's cabin inside air temperature.  Sometimes if the battery is hot, say 95F, and the OAT is 65F, then you could actually COOL the battery while charging if you leave the windows open to air out the inside so the temp inside the car doesn't warm up from the charging circuit exhaust air as well as the HVB cooling air going around in circles.  Sometimes also on a drive home late at night if you roll down all the windows and freeze your butt you can cool the HVB down.  Keeping the windows up so it stays warmer in the car definitely stops the HVB from cooling down.  Charging on 240v makes more heat than charging on 120v, so that can warm the battery up more as well from hotter exhaust air from the charging circuit as well as a higher negative load (3x more) to charge the battery faster.

 

 

Just some more common sense things I assume for EV now mode, which I am guessing is where you are coming from.

 

Yes but you can also raise the temp of the battery driving in EV later mode too!!  To stop or limit that from happening, it is essential that you re-ignite the ICE when it shuts down as soon as practical by tapping the gas pedal.  Sometimes say you're driving 55mph in EV later mode, the engine will run, you'll hit a downhill section, it shuts off, then the road levels, and the car tries to stay in EV mode for a mile while drawing 40 amps from the battery to maintain that speed.  Until the battery is exhausted (the EV later section), then it restarts the engine and the engine has to charge the battery back up at -20 amps to bring it back to up a useable EV later level.  The action of charging and discharging the battery in hybrid mode can and does heat up the battery.  Its better to keep the engine running as much as possible to prevent or lessen the charge/discharge yo yo up and down.

 

--  Keep the interior of the car as cool as possible on a hot day, (without putting more load on the battery)  especially while charging. So keep windows rolled down some and park in the shade if possible.  (I do this)

 

--  Go easy on the accelerator to keep power draw low so as not to heat up the battery.  (I do this)

 

--  Let the battery cool off if possible before charging. (I do this at night, not during the day at work)

 

--  When the outside air temp gets too high, say above 90F then don't charge the car and don't put a heavy load on the battery.

 

--  The fewer times you charge the battery, the less it will degrade. But it can take a lot of charges by design, so you just want to stay within the "normal" battery charge cycle. What is the normal cycle???  Does Ford say limit charging to once a day?

 

Every battery has some limit in charge/discharge cycles.  You get so many the more you use it the more it wears out over time.  That is expected degradation.  But you can make it worse by doing the wrong things that we are discussing,  hard acceleration, charging in the heat, charging too much, etc. etc.  There is no normal cycle so to speak, its all up to you but just remember the more you use it the more it wears.  However, you have to use it as the longer it sits the more it wears (time is also a factor but not as much as cycles), and temp is also a factor.  At the end of the day it boils down to this.  Use the battery where it works best, and use the engine where it works best.  Sometimes it makes sense to be on battery 100%, take the country roads to run errands and such, other times it makes sense to start the engine.  You will get smarter about those decisions over time.  When we all first bought this car in 2013, the goal was to never use the engine for most people.  I too would sometimes stop somewhere and recharge the battery so I can go home on battery and not start the engine (when the distance driven is more than the battery could go).  Nowadays you still might do some limited thing of this, but gone are the days where you try to burn no gas for 6 months at a time and hop from charger to charger all day long.

 

--It seems the feeling is Ford fell short on protecting the battery from accelerated loss of capacity due to heat issues. There are so many variables that go into that, I guess I am not surprised. Seems outside temp and whether you roll down the windows or not are major factors.

 

Ford never ever expected people to use the battery exclusively.  There were people on here like Gary who never burned any gas, hopped from charger to charger and then went to the dealer a year later with gas cans and asked them to cyphon the "dealer gas" out of his Cmax so he could put it in his Explorer as he didn't want to start the engine in the Cmax and ruin his lifetime 438 mpg number he had going.  Other people bought a 240v charger and fell into the mistake of being able to recharge the car in less than 2 hours and would recharge it several times and day and drive maybe 80 EV miles every day.  That didn't work out so well either.  In fact 240v charging at home backfired as it allowed people to do alot more in and out on EV errands and overheat the battery.  At the end of the day its a small battery in comparison to others so when you load it with 80 amps that alot and it can heat up the battery quickly if you maintain that load like you're trying to climb a hill on the battery and keep your speed up.  Cooler OAT and rolling down the windows helps alot, yes.  If its 60 outside but you have the windows cracked 1 inch that not nearly as good as rolled down all the way (assuming the HVB is 91F from earlier in the day).  If you drive home 1 hour say with the windows rolled up you get home with the battery at 91 or maybe even 93F.  But if you drive home 1 hour with the windows rolled down you get home with the HVB at 84F instead.  Been there done that.

 

 

One last response, I don't have a garage and keep my car outside in the driveway while charging. I charge at night and it is almost always cool, say below 80F. I live on the ocean with nice cool sea breezes.  Charging at work is more riskey, partial shade from the building, much hotter day time temps due to no sea breeze.

 
The best thing you can do is get a scangage so you can monitor the HVB temperature. I didn't have this for 4+ years and only had mine for the last 7 months or so.    Knowing that the temperature is at and how its reacting to the way you're driving gives you clues on how to change your behavior to stop the temp rise on the HVB if you find it necessary in that situation.  I mean you might not care as much going from 77 to 86, but you care alot more going to 91 to 95F.  You may get to work and the temp of the battery on Monday is 89F.  You plug it in to charge and find out when you get out that its 95F, or maybe you come out an hour later and find that it has risen to 91F, bells go off in your head and you think forget about this let me disconnect it and burn some gas, there will be another day for the battery later, especially as the weather cools in the winter you welcome the charging as it warms the car some for you so you can drive home on battery with no heat inside (you never want to use EV heat, lots of load on the battery).  If you can't live without heat, then you gotta start the engine.  But I find it very easy to live without heat in New England, especially with temps 20F or higher its no problem at all for me.  Less than 20 it can get a little challenging, but I can get used to it.
 
Hope this helps!
 
-=>Raja.


#11 ONLINE   cr08

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 09:58 PM

Ford never ever expected people to use the battery exclusively.  There were people on here like Gary who never burned any gas, hopped from charger to charger and then went to the dealer a year later with gas cans and asked them to cyphon the "dealer gas" out of his Cmax so he could put it in his Explorer as he didn't want to start the engine in the Cmax and ruin his lifetime 438 mpg number he had going.  Other people bought a 240v charger and fell into the mistake of being able to recharge the car in less than 2 hours and would recharge it several times and day and drive maybe 80 EV miles every day.  That didn't work out so well either.  In fact 240v charging at home backfired as it allowed people to do alot more in and out on EV errands and overheat the battery.  At the end of the day its a small battery in comparison to others so when you load it with 80 amps that alot and it can heat up the battery quickly if you maintain that load like you're trying to climb a hill on the battery and keep your speed up.  Cooler OAT and rolling down the windows helps alot, yes.  If its 60 outside but you have the windows cracked 1 inch that not nearly as good as rolled down all the way (assuming the HVB is 91F from earlier in the day).  If you drive home 1 hour say with the windows rolled up you get home with the battery at 91 or maybe even 93F.  But if you drive home 1 hour with the windows rolled down you get home with the HVB at 84F instead.  Been there done that.

I wanted to pick at this paragraph a little bit. I respectfully disagree in that Ford fully expected people to use the battery exclusively since the vehicle is PROGRAMMED to rely on EV power first in 95-99% of daily usage when in Auto mode. If they really did intend to temper it and mix the ICE in during regular daily usage they'd program it as such. Something like the Honda Clarity that, at last check, will mix ICE and EV usage based on a number of driving factors and SOC. Hell, Ford even went so far as to reprogram the vehicles to INCREASE the top EV speed to a whopping 85mph after they've already been out in the world.

 

It really all just boils down to poor design on Ford's part. Aside from some very extreme cases, putting blame to owners who are driving it normally like they'd do any other vehicle isn't fair. Ford themselves nor the owners manual never go into any detail of tailoring your driving or charging habits to best aid the HVB. Same goes for the early Nissan Leaf's which have the EXACT same issues with no thermal management and there's no ICE backup there. It's simply bad design and should never be blamed on driver usage.

 

If you haven't been watching the Fusion Energi forum, I highly recommend a quick read over there as they have MUCH worse battery issues than the C-Max and I'd be interested to see what your take would be there since it seems to be VERY hard to avoid overheating batteries even in the best of cases.

 

Now in contrast to the extremes (IMHO) that Raja goes to, here's a small list of what -I- do these days which doesn't go as extreme but I feel is sufficient without having to babysit the vehicle every hour of the day:

 

1) Auto/EV Now fine in-town <45-50mph, EV Later always on the highway or >45-50mph. On highway no need to babysit throttle. I often use cruise control and let it do its own thing

2) Limit acceleration in EV to 2 bars max. That feels about normal take-off speeds for me even if a little quicker than normal.

3) If just commuting and no need to do more than a charge a day, configure Value charging at home to start charging, say, at midnight to be ready in time for the morning commute. Best chance of having lower outside temps to deal with and it also gives it the opportunity to try and cool the battery without charging initially. Again, no babysitting required. Plug it in when getting home and it'll take over and wait to charge until later in the evening.

4) I definitely don't recommend more than 1 or 2 full charge cycles a day. This is one part I'll agree with Raja on. We have an engine. Use it. It's still VERY efficient. I definitely wouldn't go to major extremes like some and try to charge 5x a day and run all EV. Once at work and once at home is great and for most will greatly offset gas usage if not supplanting 80-90% of it.

 

That's really about it. That's not to say don't follow Raja's suggestions he regularly posts here if you wish to do so. By all means. But if you don't care for having to constantly babysit the vehicle, at the very least this cut-down list is largely hands off for most things.



#12 OFFLINE   Billyk24

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 04:23 AM

What about removing that plastic piece (holding the fuel funnel) during the summer months in an attempt to allow the vehicle to better vent the battery heat.



#13 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 05:16 AM

Cr08:

 

This is one part I'll agree with Raja on. We have an engine. Use it. It's still VERY efficient. I definitely wouldn't go to major extremes like some and try to charge 5x a day and run all EV.

 

The paragraph you were picking at above, what I meant by Ford never expecting the people to do what they did meant what you quoted here.  People were buying this car and treating it like a 100% EV car.   That certainly didn't help the issue at all.  However, sure, it could have been better as far as battery cooling, but the car was an early model and quite stuffed with equipment and features alot better than even some newer cars now.  Its easy to say now it wasn't perfect, but when you didn't think about this the cooling was/is sufficient for most cases especially in colder climates.  My ford mobile app is amazing compared to other stuff you get with other models.  Anyway, some things shouldn't have been done, initially the car's engineered limited EV speed to 62mph, they should have kept it that way.  Ford sales opted to increase the speed to 85 as a selling appeal aspect, but knowing that it shouldn't have been done as a smart driver you shouldn't do it anyways, stick to the original designers and keep your EV speeds below 60.

 

Billyk24:

 

Sure that helps or you can take it 1 step further and remove that entire panel by taking out the center nut and 4 torx bolts.  Then you will expose the exhaust on the left side and it can get out of the underneath area of the vehicle quicker.  You will benefit best if the windows are at least rolled down to flush out the warmer air while driving (rear windows not just the front ones) and/or if you can leave the tailgate open while charging in your garage if the battery is hot.  All this is not necessary once the colder weather returns.  Its just the dog days of summer where you have to be more cautious with battery temps.

 

-=>Raja.



#14 OFFLINE   Tom_NC_1

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 06:35 AM

What about removing that plastic piece (holding the fuel funnel) during the summer months in an attempt to allow the vehicle to better vent the battery heat.

 

That molding piece and especially the one below it at the bottom of the lower tray area is important as well. The lower moving piece directly covers the exhaust vent. With these molding pieces removed I have found it does help a little bit in keeping the HVB cooler. Don't expect any dramatic results. even a couple of degrees is a bit help in the warm climate I am in.

 

Tom



#15 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 05:26 AM

Good to hear Tom, so you find that it does help also by having those removed.  

 

-=>Raja.



#16 OFFLINE   Tom_NC_1

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Posted 22 July 2018 - 11:03 AM

Good to hear Tom, so you find that it does help also by having those removed.  

 

-=>Raja.

 

Yes it has helped. It is not a dramatic change but even a difference of a a couple of degrees is a big help. 

 

Tom










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