Jump to content

Custom Search




Welcome to the Ford C-MAX Energi Forum


Sign In  Log in with Facebook

Create Account
Welcome to the Ford C-MAX Energi Forum. You must register to create topics or post in our community - but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Ford C-MAX Energi Forum by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members
  • Create a photo album and post images. . .more.
Click here to create an account now.
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Get you C-MAX Energi Registered in the official Ford Authorized Registry. More here.


Photo
- - - - -

Energi vs Hybrid, advantages/disadvantages


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   AKTroy

AKTroy

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationAlaska
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Subaru Outback

Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:41 PM

Hello folks:

 

Complete newbie question. I have the opportunity to buy either the energi model or standard hybrid for about the same price. I thought it was a no-brainer to buy the energi model, but reading through some of the discussions it would seem some people are pretty adamant about not wanting the energi model. So, that left me confused.

 

My understanding was that the energi model has the ability to use electric only for about 20 miles. That figure varies depending on whether or not you're using air conditioning or heat, road conditions, etc. After that 20 miles, my understanding was the vehicle then reverted to a standard hybrid. Is this incorrect? I guess there's an option to to use the power immediately or later or the option of 'auto" mode if I understood the literature correctly as well?

 

Is the standard hybrid better (more efficient) at producing battery power vs the energi model? It's not as though the energi model suddenly stops after 20 miles. It just simply has to start the engine, and then gets its energy power through regenerative braking, and coasting--correct? how is this different than the standard hybrid? This is where I get confused. I thought the vehicles were essentially the same other than the energi model had the ability to run on pure electric for 20 min., so what am I missing?

 

I can appreciate you're carrying around some extra weight with the energi model, but is that enough to significantly lower mpg? I can certainly appreciate if you had no place to plug in, and the vast majority of the time you were not using the electric only mode, then that extra weight becomes a liability. But, if you can plug in at least once a day and make relatively short trips often, isn't the energi model the better way to go? It appears to me that the energi model can use 120 voltage, so it's not as though it requires a special 240 charging station, although I do realize it charges much faster that way. Seems pretty slick they designed it to be plugged into a standard wall outlet, so that opens up a lot of options for charging, albeit at a slower rate.

 

I would think in colder climates that using electric power to generate heat versus gasoline to produce heat would be cheaper but maybe not? Don't know.  I also understand the energi model can be set up so that the interior is warm (or cool) and ready to go when you are. You do not need to warm the engine up to generate heat or cooling IOW. I would think that would save fuel, no? I appreciate the engines going to have to come on in colder climates to maintain minimum antifreeze temperature assuming the battery is not adequate to produce heat or cooling in more demanding situations, but it can do so while moving, as opposed to sitting in your driveway warming up. I would think that a real plus for the energi model.

 

So, could somebody please make an argument for one over the other to help me better appreciate why you would want to choose one over the other?

 

Most of my trips are very short ( 10 miles round-trip, most even less). I would think the energi model would be ideal for this. I also live in a cold climate, so presumably I would use a lot less gas just warming the interior up correct? That is to say I could get in the car and go, and allow the engine to come up to temperature while driving as opposed to sitting in my driveway. Seems like a better way to go for short trips.

 

Now for highway driving, and longer trips I think that scenario changes. You are now carrying around a bunch of dead weight, quite literally, and that weight becomes a liability. My question is how much of a liability are we talking? What do you loose in terms of MPG from the extra weight?.  Is there any design difference in the way the vehicle produces power between the hybrid and energi model?

 

Thanks so much for helping me understand all of this!

 

Troy

 

 

 

 









Lose this advertisement by becoming a member. Click here to create a free account.

#2 OFFLINE   stolenmoment

stolenmoment

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 293 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationBoston
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Maxwell Smart

Posted 13 April 2017 - 04:37 AM

It's all about *your* driving habits.  If your usual trips (between chargers, that is) are under 20 miles, you could make good use of the Energi's battery power.  plugshare.com shows only one working public charger in Alaska, so you're on your own for charging.

 

Carrying the factory EVSE around and scrounging a socket is a possibility, even if it's very slow.  If you're sleeping, or spending a day at the office, that's not a problem.

 

I've seen pictures of public block heater plugs, and it looks like Anchorage has them; you can plug your EVSE into one of those.  I can't trivially find a reference for the supplied current, but the EVSE pulls 13A at 110v.  Also, RV parks supply power for the RVs, but I suspect you'd need a custom plug, and the rate isn't customized for BEVs.

 

It *is* true that the range drops quite a bit in the winter, due to battery chemistry; the charge in my battery at the end of my commute just took a big jump with the warmer weather we're getting here in Mass, and the heater sucks the battery dry very quickly.  If it's cold enough that I *need* the heat, I just switch the EV Later mode, and use engine heat.  This happened a few times this past winter, but generally the seat heater is enough to keep me warm.  The air conditioner, in contrast, is very efficient and I don't hesitate using it when needed.

 

Personally, my daily commute is about 11 miles each way, and there's a free charger near work, so I generally get through the workweek without burning any gas.  On weekends, I generally have to run the engine for at least one of my errands.

 

I'm very happy with my Energi, but if I couldn't charge at work, I'd be running the engine every day, and that wouldn't do me much good over the hybrid.

 

A technical note that may illuminate things: the "EV Later" mode causes the car to act like a hybrid by setting the target charge to the whatever it is when you select it, as opposed to the halfway mark of the 10% or so that's reserved for hybrid mode.



#3 OFFLINE   GS Dave

GS Dave

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 172 posts
  • Region:U.S. Southern Atlantic
  • LocationJupiter, FL
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi

Posted 13 April 2017 - 06:25 AM

So many questions...lol

 

The obvious first...hatch space...the Energi does not have much.  Its good for grocery store runs, but not much else.

 

In the winter, you will see far less range in full EV mode.  Also, while you can preheat in the Energi, on a std outlet, the heater will use more power than the charger will supply, so you will lose range.  If you are on a level 2 charger, you don't have that issue.  I think this is a huge plus in cold climates.  Your understanding of how the hybrid and Energi works is spot on.  If you have somewhere to charge each day or night, I think its a no brainer for the Energi.  If you do not have a place to charge, its a no-brainer for the hybrid.

 

When my boys go off to college, I will likely get each of them a Hybrid unless their dorms have charging stations.



#4 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 13 April 2017 - 07:43 AM

Personally...  I'd be hard pressed to pick the C-Max hybrid over the Energi...  I guess if you really needed the extra trunk space...

Or you had some other reason you really wanted the C-Max but mostly took long trips... The hybrid version does get slightly better gas mileage than the Energi due to weight savings and a better final drive ratio.  (Though if my commute goes back to being long, I'm switching back to a Prius asap, I don't consider the C-Max to be anything remotely exceptional at mpg for gas driving. There are other "normal" cars that do just as well.)

 

Yeah consider 20 miles on EV the middle of the road.  If you're in real winter country and you like things like heat, or you want to drive at highway speeds then you can drop it down to 10 miles.  If you're driving super gentle on flat roads on a wonderful spring day, no climate control on nice clean pavement and just set the cruise at like 25mph, then you can clear 30 miles.

 

On 120V, you're not going to get much useful for heating the car before you get out to drive it...  It will be better than nothing, but at best it will be "less cold".

 

Yes, you have some control over whether you start the gas engine immediately and save the major portion of the battery for later, or if you want to use the battery up first.  There are extenuating circumstances though.(like if you turn on defrost on a cold day, the gas engine will fire up.  Or if you ask for too much battery power for too long at any temp the gas engine will fire up).



#5 OFFLINE   AKTroy

AKTroy

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationAlaska
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Subaru Outback

Posted 13 April 2017 - 07:46 PM

Many thanks to all of those who responded. I can run a dedicated 240 V line for this, assuming it doesn't require a special charger box that cost big bucks. There's not many plug-in stations around here, so sounds like I would be on my own for charging. I mostly do short, in town commutes, and it sounds like this is ideal for the energi model. During the winter months here there's no question the engine is going to come on to keep the antifreeze up to temp, and this may be a good thing to keep the starter battery charged too.

 

One thing I am curious about is the overall battery life. I'm just wondering if 8- 10 years down the road if the batteries will still be good. I'm assuming a new set of batteries will set you back thousands, and at that point it's probably not worth doing so as the value of the car would have depreciated so much. It would seem the greatest bank for your buck with these is a lot of miles in a short amount of time.

 

My current vehicle is 15 yrs old, so I tend to hold onto cars a long time. I did buy it used, but have still had it 10 yrs or so. Wonder what the batteries will be like in 10 yrs in the c-max?



#6 OFFLINE   Matt Bonnett

Matt Bonnett

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • Pip
  • 35 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationColumbus, Ohio
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:C-Max Energi

Posted 14 April 2017 - 03:14 AM

The 240V charger will cost you as it is a separate purchase from the car. The car only comes with the 120V one. The good part is because it is a standard, there's plenty on the market to choose from. As long as it is a J1772 EVSE it will be compatible.



#7 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 14 April 2017 - 03:37 AM

Many thanks to all of those who responded. I can run a dedicated 240 V line for this, assuming it doesn't require a special charger box that cost big bucks. There's not many plug-in stations around here, so sounds like I would be on my own for charging. I mostly do short, in town commutes, and it sounds like this is ideal for the energi model. During the winter months here there's no question the engine is going to come on to keep the antifreeze up to temp, and this may be a good thing to keep the starter battery charged too.

 

One thing I am curious about is the overall battery life. I'm just wondering if 8- 10 years down the road if the batteries will still be good. I'm assuming a new set of batteries will set you back thousands, and at that point it's probably not worth doing so as the value of the car would have depreciated so much. It would seem the greatest bank for your buck with these is a lot of miles in a short amount of time.

 

My current vehicle is 15 yrs old, so I tend to hold onto cars a long time. I did buy it used, but have still had it 10 yrs or so. Wonder what the batteries will be like in 10 yrs in the c-max?

If you want to charge at 240V and you're only concerned with this car and not something that will take higher power down the road then you only need a circuit that will handle 15 amps continuous and a 240V EVSE will probably run you about $300.

 

As far as winter, if you're careful with the defroster and power usage, you can keep the engine from ever firing up at all(if you use heat, the coolant would be heated with an electric heater).  Down to probably around single digits F anyway...

 

Battery life remains to be seen...  There are definitely cases of reduced capacity in some of the Energi's.  I wanna say I've heard of a few people with around a 20% loss after a couple years.  Seems like most of it is more related to high temps...  You can't really tell much with the hybrid models or any of the other hybrid's like the Prius since they mostly work just fine as long as the battery isn't really to the point of being completely busted.

 

 

So if you're only worried about it being functional or not, that likelihood is probably a lot less.  Still hard to say, there aren't a ton of C-Max's out there, but I think I've only heard of one or two batteries needing to be replaced.  As far as the Prius' goes(lot more data there) there were a small percentage of battery failures in the first generation in the states back before 2003, but even that car was quite reliable and there are plenty still out there.  I've heard of a few of the 2004-2009 range, but those are still a very small percentage even up to today.

 

IF you did need replacement, then it depends on your options.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if you went to the dealer and got like a $5K+ price for battery replacement.  But, if Ford can get enough supply out there like Toyota, there should be aftermarket companies that will refurbish packs by taking a couple used packs and swapping out the dead cells and matching them, etc.  Costs then go way down.

 

So, it depends on conditions.  Mine is over 4 years old now and I can still pull over 5KWH out of it so it seems to be holding pretty well.  But I don't know if it was ever charged before I picked it up a little over a year ago...



#8 OFFLINE   AKTroy

AKTroy

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationAlaska
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Subaru Outback

Posted 14 April 2017 - 10:42 AM

Thank you very much for the detailed response. I appreciate your time. It appears Dostar ( I think that's the name) has a cable that's $269, so I guess not too bad considering the huge advantage in time for charging. Here in Alaska we definitely get below the single digits. We had about three days of -40 below last year, although that's unusual. -20 to 25 below is not all that unusual here though. No idea how these hybrids are going to handle those kinds of temps, but I can say we have hundreds of prius hybrids here that run all winter long. My understanding is the technologies are very similar between the two cars. Now, as to getting great gas mileage during those periods,  I suspect for a few months I can forget it! It should at least be a tad better than a conventional car during the extreme cold though.



#9 OFFLINE   bdginmo

bdginmo

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 122 posts
  • Region:U.S. Mississippi Valley
  • LocationSt. Louis, MO
  • My C-MAX:None
  • Current Vehicle:2015 Ford Fusion Energi

Posted 14 April 2017 - 02:14 PM

It's definitely better than a conventional car in cold weather, but you could definitely be looking at 30's for mpg in hybrid mode if it's that cold. In fact, it may never actually fully warm up.



#10 OFFLINE   AKTroy

AKTroy

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationAlaska
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Subaru Outback

Posted 14 April 2017 - 08:26 PM

I could live with 30 mpg's at those extreme temperatures. I was just looking at the new RAV-4 hybrid today, and 32mpg is normal for that hybrid, so can just imagine what happens in the cold. if I'm not mistaken the grill on the cmax has adjustable louvers, so that should definitely help to keep the engine warmer. Of course, most vehicles here have the engine block heaters, as they would never start at the below zero temps. Fortunately I have a garage, so just about guaranteed I'll start. You may be right about the engine never shutting off though. I'm not expecting miracles. Alaska has some of the harshest conditions in United States! I would imagine I would be wise to run 0-20w synthetic oil.



#11 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • PipPip
  • 3,980 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationFranklin, MA
  • My C-MAX:2017
  • Current Vehicle:Cmax Energi Titanium with Moonroof

Posted 15 April 2017 - 05:56 AM

First of all if its going to be that cold, the Cmax engine is going to start up anyways you won't be able to run on battery alone even if you didn't turn the heat on.  I am one guy that drives with no heat in the winter when running on battery and from 0F above I can run on battery 100% and travel about 21 miles in that range of say 0 to 10F.  One day it was -7 to -10F and the engine started for performance reasons even though I didn't even have the heat on.

 

If you turn the heat on at any time the engine is going to start because you're looking for heat and the car knows it can't do it on battery power only below 32F.  

 

You should buy a Cmax that comes from cold climates, Montana, Alaska probably, other places.  The cars from those regions come already with a plug for the engine block heater.  Certainly make sure the car you're buying has it so you don't have to add it.  They put them in the factory for cold climates.

 

-=>Raja.


Edited by rbort, 15 April 2017 - 05:56 AM.


#12 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 15 April 2017 - 07:35 AM

If you turn the heat on at any time the engine is going to start because you're looking for heat and the car knows it can't do it on battery power only below 32F.  

 

-=>Raja.

 

That is most definitely not true with my car.  I've driven all winter with temps down to single digits F with the heat set to 65F, EV mode and at least 2 bars of power used and no ICE startup.  Now, if you mention defrost that's a whole nother story.

 

But yeah, I've seen 25mpg in the winter at above zero temps.

 

Not sure what exactly you'll see down at those temps.  I've done -20F and -40F a couple times when I lived up in Northern NY but that was long before hybrids.  As long as your 12V battery is still decent enough to boot the computers you shouldn't have any trouble starting but I wouldn't be at all surprised if your ICE is running the entire time and still never reaches operating temp and your MPG is down around 20.

 

Yes, the C-Max has active shutters which sounds like a great idea, but in reality this car was not designed very well for cold temps.  Even with the shutters closed if it's below freezing you're going to pretty much need highway travel for a good number of minutes to get it up to the temp range it should be.  That's why there are a good number of people who plug up most or all of the front end openings so that the car will actually get to operating temps.  From what I've heard, some have even left them in during summer months and only on long mountain drives at high outside temps did the car actually start to overheat.

There was even an article somewhere about a Ford hybrid owner in a cold climate whose engine oil had turned into sludge and Ford's response was that she needed to drive her car harder so that the engine ran more to get it warmer.  



#13 OFFLINE   AKTroy

AKTroy

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationAlaska
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:Subaru Outback

Posted 15 April 2017 - 04:31 PM

It will certainly be interesting to see what features actually work in extreme cold as well. From what I have seen in other cars, hydraulics can have a real difficult time, so things like the auto assist hatch may not work. I would not be surprised if the louvers in the front have issues, weatherstripping is usually an issue as it turns into a brick. The leather seats will probably do better than some synthetic. Hopefully condensation won't be an issue with the electronics. I can remember the door chime this past winter in my Subaru sounding sick, and the cabin lights were dimmer than usual. Cold can do some really strange things to automobiles. Not uncommon to develop a flat spot in tires if not inflated properly, and talk about a bumpy ride! Until the tires warm up, there is essentially a flat spot on every revolution. I bet that's something most members here have not experienced!

 

I'm sure the C-max will be better in terms of fuel economy. it's pretty common for me to warm the car up for 10+ minutes in the driveway in the winter just to get the cabin temperature up to 10 degrees or so. Talk about wasting gas! That's 0 mpg's there. Of course, wearing a heavy jacket and gloves is key, and heated seats go a long way to keep you comfortable.



#14 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:42 AM

It will certainly be interesting to see what features actually work in extreme cold as well. From what I have seen in other cars, hydraulics can have a real difficult time, so things like the auto assist hatch may not work. I would not be surprised if the louvers in the front have issues, weatherstripping is usually an issue as it turns into a brick. The leather seats will probably do better than some synthetic. Hopefully condensation won't be an issue with the electronics. I can remember the door chime this past winter in my Subaru sounding sick, and the cabin lights were dimmer than usual. Cold can do some really strange things to automobiles. Not uncommon to develop a flat spot in tires if not inflated properly, and talk about a bumpy ride! Until the tires warm up, there is essentially a flat spot on every revolution. I bet that's something most members here have not experienced!

 

I'm sure the C-max will be better in terms of fuel economy. it's pretty common for me to warm the car up for 10+ minutes in the driveway in the winter just to get the cabin temperature up to 10 degrees or so. Talk about wasting gas! That's 0 mpg's there. Of course, wearing a heavy jacket and gloves is key, and heated seats go a long way to keep you comfortable.

Well, there's not much hydraulic on the C-Max to my knowledge so there shouldn't be much trouble there.  The hatch is electric to my knowledge(screws I believe).

I wouldn't be surprised if the louvers never try to move in the first place, but might be ok if not full of snow, etc.

Your Subaru issues sound more like low voltage issues to me...(which would be expected in those temps)

I've had flat spots on tires, but not in the cold.  It's been almost 2 decades since I dealt with that cold.  Never really had trouble, but I made sure I had synthetic fluids everywhere.  Worst trouble I recall was it being a very slow/stiff process to get the door to unlock(back when we used actual keys!)  

The C-Max might be better fuel economy, but I wouldn't bet much on it...  I wouldn't be surprised if even on 240V you don't get the interior temp up to 10's out in the driveway at those temps.  So you might end up using remote start/burning gas anyway.

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't think it will be any worse, but at those temps, I wouldn't want to bet on much improvement...  (:



#15 OFFLINE   dontfret

dontfret

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 422 posts
  • Region:U.S. Pacific Coast
  • LocationUnited States
  • Current Vehicle:CMAX Energi

Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:45 AM

My darling daughter just bought a CMAx hybrid this weekend, after driving as a apssenger and test driving my NRG.  She (as I) love the model, ride and finish, the hybrid worked best for her with the needed trunk space.  And going from ~16MPG (2000 $WD RX300) to ~38 MPG (2014 Cmax hybrid) was her goal.



#16 OFFLINE   cwstnsko

cwstnsko

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 361 posts
  • Region:Canada Prairie Provinces
  • LocationWinnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • My C-MAX:2015
  • Current Vehicle:2015 C-Max Energi

Posted 18 April 2017 - 11:47 AM

To add another cold weather data point and perhaps reconcile the difference between Raja's and Levi's experiences in the cold. 

 

Raja's description matches what I experience if the car is set to Auto.  In Auto, the car will start the engine with any significant request for heat and starts even without heat demand at a warmer temperature threshold.

 

Levi's description matches my experience with the car set to EV mode.  In EV mode, I can call for mild to moderate heat down to about -10F before the engine will start, and without heat, I can run down to about -20F before the engine starts due to temperature.

 

In Winnipeg with my fairly short (15 mi) commute, I much prefer the Energi for cold weather. I drive all electric down to about 15F with moderate use of the heater.  The Go-Times and electric heater have my car warmed up and blowing warm air right away in the morning and afternoon, even without a block heater.  My wife's Altima doesn't blow warm air until halfway through the commute, even when the block heater has been plugged in.



#17 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 18 April 2017 - 11:59 AM

To add another cold weather data point and perhaps reconcile the difference between Raja's and Levi's experiences in the cold. 

 

Raja's description matches what I experience if the car is set to Auto.  In Auto, the car will start the engine with any significant request for heat and starts even without heat demand at a warmer temperature threshold.

 

Levi's description matches my experience with the car set to EV mode.  In EV mode, I can call for mild to moderate heat down to about -10F before the engine will start, and without heat, I can run down to about -20F before the engine starts due to temperature.

 

In Winnipeg with my fairly short (15 mi) commute, I much prefer the Energi for cold weather. I drive all electric down to about 15F with moderate use of the heater.  The Go-Times and electric heater have my car warmed up and blowing warm air right away in the morning and afternoon, even without a block heater.  My wife's Altima doesn't blow warm air until halfway through the commute, even when the block heater has been plugged in.

 

Yes, in Auto mode the car will start the ICE very easily and keep it running.  I generally try to stay out of Auto.  Even at warm temps I've found times where it seemed like it passed it's EV setpoint by like 1% so it would still use maybe just under 2 bars of EV and then keep the gas engine running at the same time for the entire time, so basically hugely wasteful.

 

Have you been able to get a nice warm cabin with just 15 minutes warm up on the Go Time even at -20F?

Seems like at around 15F temps, mine will be blowing warm(ish) air after about 15 minutes, but it's more like 20 minutes or so to have the cabin actually feeling pretty warm.

 

Yes, it's definitely still a lot more efficient for short trips down to temps like 10 or 15F.  I can preheat, then leave the heat on and usually just squeak in to work at about 13 miles without dropping into hybrid mode.  Though if I take one of the alternate routes with a couple more uphills...  Even if I take them slow and gentle I've found myself turning off the heat for a few minutes to avoid the ICE coming on just before I get to work.



#18 OFFLINE   cwstnsko

cwstnsko

    New Member

  • C-MAX Energi Member
  • Pip
  • 361 posts
  • Region:Canada Prairie Provinces
  • LocationWinnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • My C-MAX:2015
  • Current Vehicle:2015 C-Max Energi

Posted 18 April 2017 - 12:24 PM

If I am using Go-times, rather than remote start, my car seems to start working on warming the car up as much as an hour before the Go-Time.  At work on 240V it definitely get that whole car fully warm, and melts away the snow and ice most of the time :-)  At home on 120V,  I generally set the Go-Time to 10 minutes before the time I actually plan to leave, which allows the car an extra 10 minutes to " take the edge off".  Once I start the car the climate control power jumps way up and it blows warm air quickly, although I wouldn't say I often get the cab thoroughly warmed up.  I usually keep the fan on low and the temperature set to a modest number to keep the chill in check without being too hard on the battery, but it's still much warmer than my wife's ICE car.  I too will turn the heat off for that last few blocks, i it looks like I'm close to starting the ICE. 

 

In comparison, the hybrid, with no Go-Times and no electric heating capability would be much more like a regular ICE car in the winter



#19 OFFLINE   Levi Smith

Levi Smith

    Energi Member

  • C-MAX Energi Facebook
  • PipPip
  • 832 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationUpstate NY
  • My C-MAX:2013
  • Current Vehicle:2013 C-Max Energi 303A W Panoramic Roof

Posted 18 April 2017 - 12:47 PM

Interesting. I've got no charging at work so 99% of the time it's only at home in the morning but I've never seen it start heating more than 15 minutes before the Go time. And then it will run for 15 minutes past the Go Time.










0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Privacy Policy TERMS OF SERVICE ·