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Brand New Owner with Questions


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27 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   drdiesel1

drdiesel1

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  • Current Vehicle:2014 Ford C-Max Energi

Posted 22 December 2014 - 07:28 PM

Dr diesel:

 

I'd say yes on shallow hills but not on steeper ones.  Hill assist can only hold the car with shallower hills, once they become steep it seems to let the car overspeed.  I'm saying using L to maintain the speed so you get better mpge numbers as letting the car run away and back down to the speed I found less mpge for the same distance traveled due to more friction.

 

-=>Raja.

 

Never had a problem with it not controlling speed and I have some big hills out here in CA :shift:









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#22 OFFLINE   rbort

rbort

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 07:50 PM

Mine overspeeds a little bit on steep hills, won't hold it steady at 38mph for example on a steep hill.  A shallow one no problem, but a steep one I know how steep it takes I can decide to use L instead and go back to D as the hill starts to shallow out.  

 

Try yours on a steep hill in CA and let me know if it holds your speed to with no gain at all in hill assist or not.

 

-=>Raja.



#23 OFFLINE   stevedebi

stevedebi

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 08:30 AM

Yes but sometimes it doesn't count!  Here is an example.  You're driving on the highway and push EV later at 55% remaining charge.  The car runs the engine and stops it as needed as you go up and down hills.  You reach a point on the highway where its a shallow downgrade, the battery is at 54% but the engine shuts off as you have room to the downside.  You're going downhill on the battery, it goes on for a little bit and now you're at 51% and your on-ramp is coming.  You switch to EV later and get on the ramp, but you switch at 51%.  You brake, regen all the way to 53% at the end of the ramp.  You cycle back to EV later but now you're at 53% instead of the original 55%, you actually LOST 2% of the bank instead of gaining any.

 

Make sense?  If you're trying to bank any excess charge, you must cycle EV later ONLY when the charge level indicated in MFT is 56 or 57%, no other option other than that.  Anything lower, 55 does nothing and 54 or less you lose charge.  However, if you lose charge down to 53% new setting, the engine does not have to recharge the HVB past 55% now, before the limit was 57%, now its 55% (the setting plus 2% max) so now your gas mileage goes up a little bit on the account of using 2% battery charge.

 

-=>Raja.

Raja,

I don't follow your example. If I'm on the off ramp, I won't be going back to EV Later. It will stay in EV Now.

 

However, for those reading, I should note that in a situation when you are driving on the freeway, even switching at 56% could actually cost gas MPG - even though the reserve % is higher. The only time I'm positive that "extra" energy is bankable is when the car is in blue EV mode, the charge indicator ^ is above the battery, and the percentage is above the reserve setting. In that situation, switching out of EV Later and then back in will add reserve without causing an MPG hit to the ICE. In those situations I switch to "capture" energy when I'm at the bottom of the hill (it is always a hill of some kind, so far, unless you are slowing down to stop or for traffic) and the ICE is about to kick back in.

 

It can be deceptive to use only the percentage indicator in the MFT, because it can go above the reserve when it is the ICE charging and the indicators are white (ICE on) instead of blue (EV).


Edited by stevedebi, 23 December 2014 - 08:32 AM.


#24 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 02:19 PM

I tried to make an example to make sense, here try this, you're coming to a toll booth, so you switch to EV now to recharge while braking and then go back to EV later as you pull away from the toll booth.  Use this analogy in the rest of the example and see if that makes sense to you.

 

It can be deceptive to use only the percentage indicator in the MFT, because it can go above the reserve when it is the ICE charging and the indicators are white (ICE on) instead of blue (EV).

 

If doesn't make ANY difference where the charge comes from, the engine or the hill or stopping for a toll booth.  If you made extra charge over 55% threshold set in EV later, cycling EV later will bank that extra charge %.  Doesn't matter where you made it, you still lose MPG after you cycle because the engine has to recharge higher now. +1 to +2% more before leveling off.

 

So, if you go down a hill and get +2% more and you bank it, well the engine now at 57% has to charge to 59% before you start getting good mpg numbers.  If you didn't bank it and the threshold is still at 55% and you're at 57%, then you're going to benefit immediately from better mpg numbers as at 57% the engine doesn't have to charge the HVB any more.

 

There are many variables into play, you need to watch everything.  From vehicle speed to road grade to power demand to charge % for all things to fall into play and determine your mpg numbers.

 

-=>Raja.



#25 OFFLINE   stevedebi

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 03:10 PM

I tried to make an example to make sense, here try this, you're coming to a toll booth, so you switch to EV now to recharge while braking and then go back to EV later as you pull away from the toll booth.  Use this analogy in the rest of the example and see if that makes sense to you.

 

 

 

 

If doesn't make ANY difference where the charge comes from, the engine or the hill or stopping for a toll booth.  If you made extra charge over 55% threshold set in EV later, cycling EV later will bank that extra charge %.  Doesn't matter where you made it, you still lose MPG after you cycle because the engine has to recharge higher now. +1 to +2% more before leveling off.

 

So, if you go down a hill and get +2% more and you bank it, well the engine now at 57% has to charge to 59% before you start getting good mpg numbers.  If you didn't bank it and the threshold is still at 55% and you're at 57%, then you're going to benefit immediately from better mpg numbers as at 57% the engine doesn't have to charge the HVB any more.

 

There are many variables into play, you need to watch everything.  From vehicle speed to road grade to power demand to charge % for all things to fall into play and determine your mpg numbers.

 

-=>Raja.

Raja,

I'm not sure how we got into this. My original statement was to switch to EV Now on the off ramp, in which case the ICE will not lose MPG because it won't be coming on while there is EV power remaining..

 

I've not noticed any loss of ICE MPG when cycling EV Now after a long hill, but then I've only done it a few times. But it would make sense, because the ICE will lose the extra help from whatever energy is "banked". I have noticed the loss when the ICE is running. I'll have to monitor this on my next long trip.



#26 OFFLINE   drdiesel1

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 01:01 AM

A few mph over run isn't worth worrying about, IMO :shift:



#27 OFFLINE   rbort

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 05:44 AM

Correct, but one day I ran a test route 10 times and got some measurements.  Using L to hold the car back at the same speed down the steep hil worked the best in charging the battery the most and using that charge later to get to the same point with the most mpge number.

 

Letting the car overrun gave worse mpge numbers.

 

When it comes down to it, its not much, but if you do this for the while battery you may end up with an extra mile at the end.

 

-=>Raja.



#28 OFFLINE   drdiesel1

drdiesel1

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 03:59 PM

Correct, but one day I ran a test route 10 times and got some measurements.  Using L to hold the car back at the same speed down the steep hil worked the best in charging the battery the most and using that charge later to get to the same point with the most mpge number.

 

Letting the car overrun gave worse mpge numbers.

 

When it comes down to it, its not much, but if you do this for the while battery you may end up with an extra mile at the end.

 

-=>Raja.

We can do a lot of things to add mileage, but I'm not really gonna go to extremes for little return.

I drive my car and get 80 mpg on average. That's without hypermiling or over complicating my drive.

By simply letting the car do it's thing while I work the systems using the skinny pedal and the DHA button.

 

Works pretty good for me........YMMV :shift:


Edited by drdiesel1, 02 January 2015 - 04:00 PM.









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